Fear of needles, known in medical literature as needle phobia, is the extreme fear of medical procedures involving injections or hypodermic needles.

It is occasionally referred to as aichmophobia or belonephobia, although these terms may also refer to a more general fear of sharply pointed objects. It has also been referred to as trypanophobia, although the origin and proper usage of that term is highly controversial.
For more news, views and funny stuff follow Trending Nurses on Facebook:

The condition was officially recognized in 1994 in the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition) as a specific phobia of blood/injection/injury type. Phobic level responses to injections cause sufferers to avoid inoculations, blood tests, and in the more severe cases, all medical care.

It is estimated that at least 10% of American adults have a fear of needles, and it is likely that the actual number is larger, as the most severe cases are never documented due to the tendency of the sufferer to avoid all medical treatment.

Children are especially afraid of needles because they’re unused to the sensation of their skin being pricked by something sharp. By the time most people reach adulthood, they can tolerate needles much more easily.

But for some, a fear of needles stays with them into adulthood. Sometimes this fear can be extremely intense. For this grown man in the following video, the whole experience reduces him to tears.

For more news, views and funny stuff follow Trending Nurses on Facebook: